Capable Water Pumps


If you own a home, there is a high probability that there is a submersible water pump located in your basement or a crawl space under your home. Submersible water pumps provide a singular function: to drain out any water that seeps into your basement and push it to a more appropriate locations (such as your lawn), before damage is done to your home. Most home owners don't even realize they have a sump until it breaks down. If your sump pump stops working it is likely that you may need to replace it.

Replacing a sump pump on your own, instead of calling the local plumber can save you hundreds of dollars if you know what you're doing. There is some risk involved, but if you follow the simple instructions in this article then you will have your sump pump replaced in as little as 30 minutes.

Before diving in, take a few moments to determine why you may need to replace the sump pump. The following checklist will help you decide if purchasing a sump pump is necessary.

  1. Is There A Problem With The Diaphragm Switch? (This is the #1 reason why sump pumps stop working correctly)
  2. Are There Any Noticeable Blockages?
  3. Is Your Sump Pump unplugged?
  4. Are There Any Disconnected Pipes?

If you answer no to the above questions then replacement may be necessary. When shopping for a submersible water pump look for one that is the same voltage, discharge size and HP (horse power) as your current pump. You should be able to locate this information on your old pump's motor plate.

Before Installing The Sump Pump

Before getting started, be sure you have all the tools that you may need.Some of these tools may include:

  • Tape Measure
  • Pipe Wrench
  • Phillips and Flat Head Screwdrivers
  • Hand Saw
  • Up to 5 feet of PVC Pipe
  • The Appropriate PVC Connectors and Adhesive
  • Hose Clamps
  • Check Valve (this allows water to be pumped out but keeps it from flowing back in)

Sump pumps come in four different models, the pedestal, submersible, water-powered and floor sucker pumps. The instructions that follow are for submersible water pumps. Submersible sump pumps have three connections. the first is the electrical connection, which is a 3 wire plug that connects to an outlet at least four feet above ground level. It is necessary for the outlet to be a ground fault interrupt that is correctly rated for the amperage of the pump motor. the second connection is at the base and is typically a 1/4 inch plastic fitting. This should have a back flow check valve installed that prevents water from flowing back into the sump pit after it has been drained. The third and final connector is the hose or pipe that connects the pump to the drain line. Be sure to look over the pipe carefully for pin holes before reusing in case it needs to be replaced.

Replace Your Sump Pump In 5 Steps:

  1. Unplug The Submersible Water Pump Locate where you need to disconnect the pump from the drain line.To remove the sump pump, you will need to either un-clamp the pump or unscrew it from the drain line. Loosen the clamps that fasten the check valve to the discharge pipe and then remove the valve.
  2. Remove The Pump From The Sump Pit Slip the pit lid up over the discharge pipe where the check valve was, and set it aside. Then, grab the discharge pipe sticking up out of the pit and pull out the pump. Set it aside and allow the water to drain out of it for a few moments. Check to see if there are any piping or fittings that are between the water outlet opening and where the pump is connected to the drain line. If there is, remove and set aside to attach later to the new pump. If you have a solid discharge pump, you may need to saw through it in order to remove it. You can later use rubber pipe joiners to restore the connection.
  3. Take the pump with you to your local plumping supply store or hardware store and allow them to help you choose a replacement pump that requires the same power source and same drain-line hookups and plumbing capabilities as your old pump.
  4. Install Your New Sump Pump Use a wet vacuum to clean out the bottom of the sump pit, then inspect the pit for any damage it may have. If all looks good, then your ready to install your new pump. Unpack your new water pump and remove any packaging that may be holding wires and floats. If you're replacing the pipe, you will need to measure, mark and cut a new piece of PVC to the correct parameters so that the new pump will reach up to securely connect the check valve. submersible water pump. Move the pump into position directly under the new piece of PVC into the check valve where you can fasten it tightly. If your pump uses a float switch, make sure it has can freely travel within the sump basin.
  5. Test Out Your New Submersible Sump PumpOnce you have the pump installed, then you can test it out by plugging it in to the outlet and pouring water into the pit. The pump should kick on when the float reaches the preset level or immediately if you're using a diaphragm switch instead of a float. The water in the pit will drain completely in a short amount of time if your pump is set up correctly.

Congratulations! You have save yourself a large amount of money. If at any time during the removal l and installation process that you require help, you can refer to the manufacturer's manual or you can ask for help from your local hardware store experts.